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20121101
20121130
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KQED (PBS) 30
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English 30
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the country. with more than $350 million spent on ballot measures in california alone. and voter registration in the state has hit an all-time high with 18 million now on the rolls. who are the now voters and what are their interests and concerns? plus, a million giant fan faithf faithfuls hit the streets to celebrate their world series sweep. coming up next. >>> hello, i'm belva davis and welcome to "this week in northern california." joining me on the news panel tonight, josh richman, regional political reporter for the bay area news group. carla marin you've cci, "san francisco chronicle." and odette keeley, new america media anchor and executive producer. and in sacramento, john myers, kxtv news 10, political editor. well, this campaign season has been marked by massive amounts of spending from outside groups, yet, with all of the money spent and all of the people who paid attention, the race for president remains too close to call. and here in california, we're feeling the affects of an onslaught of political ads for candidates and boll lot meallot. john, you were reporting on an $11 mil
electorate. here in california, big win for governor jerry brown and his proposition 30, brings relief to scho schools. >> californians made the courageous decision to protect our schools and colleges and strengthen the california dream. bl >> belva: and a win-win for california democrats with an apparent two-thirds super majority in the legislature and the ability to raise taxes without votes from republicans. >> i promise that we will exercise this new power with strength but also with humility and with reason. >> belva: also, author maya angelou shares her story and warm words of wisdom about the meaning of friendship. >> it keeps you alive. it keeps you awake. it keeps you trying to be the best. >> belva: coming up next. . >>> hello, i'm belva davis, and welcome to "this week in northern california." joining me on this special night, my last, as host here are jill tucker, "san francisco chronicle". lisa vor der brugen, "bay area news group." paul rogers, environment writer for "san jose mercury news." and carla marinucci, "san francisco chronicle," senior political reporter. carla,
is changing, nina. >> it is. after losing proposition aids in california, democrats were devastated -- proposition 8 in california, democrats were devastated. people talk about marriage, love, commitment. they changed the message. they wanted what everyone else wanted and people understood that and they are beginning to succeed everywhere except the south. >> jerry brown got the tax in california. >> jerry brown did something for which he deserves credit. he was elected governor and he said i will not raise taxes unless i have the approval of the people of this date. to rescue the state's of california public school system, he went and said we need a tax increase. we need a tax increase of billions. and they voted for ed. i say hat's off to him and to californians for stepping up. >> legalizing marijuana nationwide? >> hats off also for the date marriage issue to joe biden who stepped up and said -- for the gay marriage issue it to joe biden who stepped up and said he was born at. that set a tone for the president and the vice president of the united states to come out that way. and
a lot of time in california, illinois, new york, texas. those are four states that the candidates did not spend much time if at all this year with the exception of going to fund raise. that shows how different things are now. >> woodruff: richard, it's certainly not that there hasn't been partisanship. it's a matter of... whether there's been geographic partisanship. >> that's well put, judy. ohio, for example, for most of its history for well over 100 years has stood out. it's been the mother of presidents and the maker of presidents. it's the country in microcosm. it is urban. it is rural. it is agricultural. it is industrial. it is a strong tradition of organized labor. it has significant minority populations. if you were going to disstill the united states in the mid 20th century at the end of the 20th century, you know, you'd be hard pressed to do better than ohio. in some ways it makes a lot of sense that ohio has attracted as much attention as it has. >> ifill: michael and richard, let's think about california. big, big state. very diverse. densely populated. has farms. it has
, new york, pennsylvania, california have gone democratic in six straight elections. the other two, ohio and florida have swung democratic in two elections. and in texas, the white folks in chief connection texas -- texas are now a minority. >>> do you think this was a split verdict? >> not at all. the president won 51.4% of the popular vote which he becomes the sixth president in history to win two terms with over 50% of the dwight eisenhower, i might add. he won an electoral college landslide. george w. bush with a much smaller electoral win pronounced he had a mandate. this president is not going to use that language, it is oh, so 20th century, not how he intends to govern. but beneath the numbers of a reelected president, a senate that is divided, there was an earthquake. it was an election that, republicans should have won in a bad economy, with all that money, and they lost virtually every group. they even lost cubans in florida, which used to reliable vote. so you have to ask what does the republican party do next? but that is not my top priority frankly. >> don't broad brush it e
defeated in the governorship of california two years prior. nothing is forever. ever say never. nothing is toast. anyone can come back. a guy could come by in a white horse and there could be a new candidate emerging. it is too soon to tell. i would not put them into toast. do they have to come -- they have to find someone. we are very people oriented, not party oriented. obama was like. one of these that helped obama is people like him. that is a lot going for you if you can be like. they did not know romney and i do not think romney ever sold himself well enough to make that leap. rubio may be a tremendous canada. if he has charisma and he can swing through primaries, anything can happen but i would never locked in something. by any means it is not toast. tavis: if i were pushing back on larry king and i would never do that to larry king. if i want to push back i would only say that what makes your example different than the contemporary moment that we're in is america was basically white and black then add a lot more white than black. now america is a multi-cultural, multi racial, mu
california to colorado, the fate of the earth -- those who are concerned about these issues are not a fringe minority. not even a silent majority. but the silenced majority, silenced by the corporate media which is why we have to take it back. and that is a critical part of all of this. demanding that the meeting opened up and provide a forum for people to speak for themselves. i want to give an example of the first day of the democratic convention in charlotte. i was going inside -- it was about to be opened and i got a text that there would be in action right outside near the convention center. it is often more interesting to be outside than in. and this bus pulls up and it has butterflies all over it. it is the undocubus and. undocumented immigrants to get out of the bus very quickly. they were inspired by the young dreamers, the high school and college students who sat in at president obama's campaign offices demanding that the dream act be passed. they risked more than a rest. they were incredibly brave. the risk deportation, often to countries that they did not even know. maybe they mo
was elected governor of california. four years later, richard nixon was president. they have something the democrats did not have. they have a great post-boomer generation and trade when you think of them, -- a generation. when you think of them, that is a pretty good bench of energetic, slick, youngish politicians. when you are talking about the democratic party you are talking about joe biden and hillary clinton. we might prefer them to the republican contenders but that is a different generation. there is not this deep democratic bench. >> mr. obama has won a second term. what is your sense of the kind of legacy that he wants to leave in the second term. is he going to be more progressive. toss me about obama's future right quick. >> -- tell me about obama's feature right quick. >> he wants to have a very free pass toward enactment. he would like to fix the fiscal stuff that is on the table even as we speak. i want to believe but i do not have any reason to believe that he would want part of his legacy to deal with the inequality in this country, the short sick that the middle-class
becoming the entire focus of their attention? >> california congressman dana rohrbaugcher -- "what is clear is that this administration, including the president himself, has misinformed -- read 'lied'-- " >> where is the proof? >> the president needs reasons for drugs and keeping up the war on terror. -- drones and keeping up the war on terror. >> cynical political attack. >> are they trying to turn it into watergate? >> they are trying to turn into anything. john mccain put sarah palin with the heartbeat of the presidency but he cannot vote for susan rice because he cannot trust her. >> i agree with everything said, but i watched her on those shows contemporaneously, and i remember thinking to myself, how does she know this so assuredly? there was a tone to it, almost a battle tone -- >> you read the transcript of her interview with bob schieffer, and there are caveats all through -- "based on what we know now." she was working from talking points from the administration. >> you are never going to satisfy charles krauthammer and with that. >> i will try, for goodness' sake. >> we would lik
the campaign. >> remember when carl drove they did a bunch of california events at the end of their race when george w. bush was running just to get inside the opponent's head. don't overestimate the maturity of what's going on. >> woodruff: i'm told they have senate races that we are prepared to call. i'm just looking at what time it is. it's 22 minutes after 9:00 on the east coast. we are able to project for the pennsylvania senate that bob casey is returning for a second term. >> ifill: he beat tom smith who was a very well known tea-part candidate. he put a lot of money in. >> $20 million of his own money. the democratic incumbent wins in michigan. >> woodruff: i remember the day when there weren't that many women. we've just announced three in a row. here in texas someone who will replace a woman in the senate. he is ted cruz. he has been very closely affiliated with the tea party. this is a win for the republicans in the state of texas and a very important win. >> ifill: and a rising star in the republican party. he had a big turn at the republican national convention as i recall. >> he
want to bring up quickly california where there are a number of issues on the ballot. having to do with taxes. and a number of other topics. >> california is really ground zero for the initiative process. they tend to have more initiatives than any other state. they have 11 this year including two competing measures that would increase taxes in different ways to fund education and help balance the state budget. >> woodruff: we also know that health care is on the ballot. remind us where and what that would mean if those were to pass. >> sure. there are five states that have votes on the affordable care act this year. in missouri, it's bill that would prohibit the state from setting up a health insurance exchange. in the other four states it's a broader measure that attempts to block really implementation of the affordable care act. it sets up the right to have private insurance as a constitutional right in the state and prohibits the state from requiring anybody to buy insurance or penalizing anybody for failing to buy insurance. >> woodruff: and just quickly what are the polls sho
jersey as cokie pointed out but also places like california which are states that he would have won anyway but there was so much organic enthusiasm for barack obama in 2008 that he won -- that a lot of people turned out even in deep blue states where their votes, of course, didn't count, they turned out in mass numbers. the president's people knee this year that's not going to happen. so in terms of the overall national popular vote, if you think about red states and blue states where neither campaign is trying to turn out the vote, the blue states like california and new york for various reasons the president's numbers won't be anywhere near as strong as they were in 2008 whereas in the deep red state there is's so much antipathy towards the president that people will turn out in those states even though they are deep red states. they'll turn out the cast a symbolic vote against barack obama. so that's one thing that skews the popular vote by conceivably on election day towards romney more than people are necessarily expecting >> i think that's absolutely right. the red states are
. history in the polls would indicate that, for example, california will go to the democrats and texas to the republicans. which means the outcome of this election will actually be decided in just a handful of states. this has been the most extensive and expensive election in history. the romney campaign has probably done all it can to secure victory. now america must decide if he's the right man to lead the country. >> for more on how this race is shaping up in these very final hours, i'm joined by jim gilmore. he's the former republican governor of virginia and nia who served in the clinton and obama administrations. governor, let me start with you. virginia, i have to ask you, how is it looking for mitt romney? >> he looks very good for mitt romney. i think he's quite likely to carry virginia. but it's very close. so a lot depends upon how things turn out tomorrow, who's excited about going to vote. but it looks like romney's going to carry virginia. >> we'll be watching your state tomorrow night but let me ask you this. if you look at the state of the american economy and you look
facilities in california. boeing hopes to cut costs by more than $1.5 billion over the next two years. >> susie: boeing shares got caught up in the market downdraft, tom, falling 2%, and it had plenty of company. all 30 of the dow components were in the red today. >> there was a lot of red on the screen this post-election day. in europe, and also earnings, all getting mixed in here. let's get under way with tonight's market focus. >> tom: stocks dropped right from the opening bell today as investor focus shifted beyond election day. the s&p 500 opened down, and fell to its lowest price of the session just before noon eastern time. the pressure was steady throughout the afternoon hours, with the index finishing lower by 2.4%. today's drop in s&p 500 is its sharpest sell-off in four and a half months. it takes the index down to a level last seen in august. trading volume was heavier. 875 million shares on the big board. just over two billion traded on the nasdaq. leading the sell-off, the financial sector falling 3.5%, the energy sector dropped 3.1%, and technology was under pressure ag
business the jolt it needs. >> reporter: the chevrolet spark e.v. will hit showrooms in california and oregon next summer. engineers are still testing the pure plug-in so general motors can't say yet how many miles the sub-compact will get on a single charge. what it can say is new technology will allow for faster charging. the spark won't be cheap. with tax incentives, the car's sticker price will be about $25,000, double the price of the gas-powered version. >> when you look at the functionality that this vehicle has and the range we offer-- which we believe is the top of its segment-- it is going to be extremely competitive from a price perspective. you're always going to pay more for an electric vehicle than you would for a traditional vehicle with a gas engine. >> reporter: general motors has placed a huge bet on electric vehicles, hoping they'll help the company reach the government's 50-mile per gallon corporate average fuel economy requirement in 2025. but so far, interest in e.v.s has been lukewarm. g.m. launched the electric hybrid volt nearly two years ago, but so far th
and destroy fewer communities and fewer lives that way. >> california just took steps to weaken their three strikes and you're out policy. that's a step in the right direction. >> and you also have folks on both sides of the political aisle who are making progress on that. >> but in terms of washington politics it looks to me as if all the blood, sweat and tears of this campaign, all those billions of dollars ended up with the status quo. the republican leadership in washington said the day after the election, "no new revenue, no new taxes." and many conservative activists are not yielding an inch despite the election results. let me play for you an excerpt from a video that was put out by one of the leading conservative activists at the heritage foundation which is sort of the granddaddy of conservative think tanks. >> president obama's re-election is a devastating blow. but it's not a decisive defeat. we are in a war. we're in a war to save this nation. and abandoning our post will condemn it to a future of managed decline. to win this war we must remain committed to fighting president ob
. as you can see from some of these maps, they showed california as an island and it took a long time for that to actually get removed from the maps-- old maps, it often took 100 years, maybe 200 years. >> reporter: google and others can react more quickly because of all the input they get. thousands of times a day, people all over the world tell google, via the internet, that roads, or signage, or stores or parks have changed, or that a their own neighborhood is poorly represented and that the company needs to update its maps. google investigates the alleged errors, and tries to correct them. the concept of having people on the ground change the map is called crowd sourcing. and it's the principle pioneered by an israeli-based mapping company called waze. that firm, with a small palo alto office, uses g.p.s. to track the location of 27 million drivers who have downloaded its app. waze depends on that crowd to update its maps, determine traffic congestion and direct users to alternate routes. >> so while you're getting a free navigation service, you're also contributing to the communi
and congressional races on the ballot in california. and older americans are working longer and returning to the workforce after retiring. you can help paul solman look into that demographic shift. if you're an older worker, fill out a questionnare on the rundown. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. jeff? >> brown: and again, to our honor roll of american service personnel killed in the afghanistan conflict. we add them as their deaths are made official and photographs become available. here, in silence, are eight more. >> brown: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening with mark shields and david brooks among others. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer producti
the empire state building, seven killed at a university in oakland, california, seven dead at a sikh temple in oak creek, wisconsin. 12 killed and dozens more wound at a move yee these per in aurora, colorado. and then there was this. >> i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the -- >> congresswoman gabby giffords leading the democratic national convention in the pledge of allegiance some 20 months after she was shot in the head in arizona. >> with liberty and justice for all. (cheers and applause) >> there was one brief exchange during the second debate about gun violence. >> i also share your belief that weapons that were designed for soldiers in war theatres don't belong on our streets. >> i'm not in favor of new pieces of legislation on guns and taking guns away or making certain guns illegal. >> reporter: but during three hours of debates devoted to domestic matters the phrase "gun control" was never mentioned, not even by the democratic incumbent. >> you'll find the rest of that segment >> brown: you'll find the rest of that segment and much more on our
and in the midst of the california wildfires six years ago, for the first time you saw private firefighters showing up at people's homes, spraying them with fire retardant, so when the fire came this mansion would be standing and the next one might burn to the ground. this is extraordinary because we would tend to think of fire fighting, this is definitely a public good and definitely something that people get equally and now we're finding that even -- there's even a two-tiering of protection from wildfires. >> if there was even a short-lived airline in florida, i read about, that offered five-star evacuation service in the events of hurricane. >> yea, after hurricane katrina a company in florida saw a market opportunity and they decided to offer a charter airline that would turn your hurricane into a luxury vacation. that was actually the slogan. they would let you know a hurricane was headed to your area. they would pick you up in a limousine and drive you to the airport and they would make you five-star hotel reservations at the destination of your choice. why does a hurricane have to be bad new
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)